Author Archive

Fall Back

FALL BACK

As I started to get older I began to realize I was becoming more and more negatively affected by the change of seasons. Fall has always been the toughest of those for me.

The Fall season was always a reminder that Winter is approaching quickly. Here in the Northeast, Winter is cold, damp, and windy. It’s also dark and can be lonely. For me, the thought of Winters dreariness wasn’t much to look forward to.

My feelings of sadness always started around Labor Day and if I’m being honest as the weekend approached for the Fall Back or the scheduled time change I would be in a full-blown depression.

When do we turn the clocks back in 2021?

Sunday, November 7, 2021, 2:00:00 am clocks are turned backward 1 hour to Sunday, November 7, 2021, 1:00:00 am local standard time instead. Sunrise and sunset will be about 1 hour earlier on Nov 7, 2021, than the day before. It will be lighter in the morning. Also called Fall Back and Wintertime.

When I was diagnosed with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD,) to be honest I thought it was a made-up, fake condition.

It always started for me in late August. As a single mom, the thought of needing to buy school supplies, uniforms, and winter coats was stressful. The fear of not being able to provide for my kids drained my energy and left me feeling hopeless and worthless.

SAD is a type of depression that occurs and is related to changes in the season as well as changes in your internal clock.

Knowing the holidays were approaching caused even more stress.

When I started to chronically oversleep, lost interest in my work, and was obsessive about keeping the curtains closed, shutting out the light I knew I needed help.

SAD is common. There are over 3-million cases diagnosed every year in the United States.

It’s perfectly normal to have occasional bouts of the blues or to find yourself in a bit of a funk. These are our body’s way of telling us to slow down a bit, to recharge our batteries. To get yourself out of a funk try:

  • Sit by a window at work and at home
  • Keep your house well lit
  • Take a walk or at least get outside for a few minutes every day.
  • Set goals and make plans
  • Start a new hobby
  • Exercise

I am a firm believer in maintaining a positive mindset and I manage to stay positive by always having something to look forward to.

If your blues last for more than a few days, if you start to dread activities you used to enjoy, if you feel like you have nothing to look forward to, aren’t eating or sleeping properly, and especially if you are having thoughts of suicide it’s time to call your doctor.

Treatment for SAD may be as simple as light therapy, counseling, and in more serious cases, medication.

I’m so grateful I sought help and although Fall can still be a bit overwhelming I now look at the changing leaves as a miracle. A reminder that even though we’re losing something there is always something brighter to look forward to, even during the dreary winter months.

I’ve learned to look forward to and appreciate slowing down on snowy days and enjoying a good book and a mug of hot chocolate.

Thanksgiving has become my favorite holiday. It’s one of the least commercial. There is no stress of choosing and buying gifts. Only the joy of getting together with family and friends and sharing a delicious meal and discussing what we’ve been most grateful for throughout the year.

Have you ever been affected by the changes in seasons? What are you most grateful for?

~~

The ebook is finally available for the Stranger In My Recliner!

The Stranger in my Recliner: An intimate look at the homelessness and mental health crisis by Doreen Mcgettigan | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble® (barnesandnoble.com)

The Stranger in my Recliner: An intimate look at the homelessness and mental health crisis – Kindle edition by McGettigan, Doreen. Health, Fitness & Dieting Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

‎The Stranger in my Recliner: An intimate look at the homelessness and mental health crisis on Apple Books

The Stranger in my Recliner eBook by Doreen McGettigan – 9781647197179 | Rakuten Kobo United States

REALIZE YOUR WRITING DREAMS: Actionable Tips on Writing, Publishing and Marketing by Doreen McGettigan (booklocker.com)

The Stranger In My Recliner Is Here!

I am so excited to share Sophie’s story again!

From the Publisher: From Amazon:

Let’s Talk Money..

I love introducing you to new authors. Dawn and I met through #FemCityPhiladelphia and I am so excited to share her and her fabulous book with you!

The Author: Dawn Santoriello, CFP®

About the Book: Available July 27, 2021 at 12:00 p.m! 

Have you ever felt “stuck” in your financial goals? Have you spent years struggling to pay off debt while also trying to save for your future? In The Spiritual Path to Prosperity…The Truth About Money Revealed, author Dawn Santoriello, CFP(R) gives you the tools to determine why you’re facing these “money blocks” and how to clear them. She offers her deep knowledge of the financial world by sharing tips and tricks for investing your money to grow your wealth as well as proven strategies for saving.

More than that, Dawn gives you a glimpse into her own story by sharing her financial tragedies and triumphs. A graduate of Adelphi University with a BS in Finance and a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER(TM), Dawn studied for years, and she wants to help you achieve your financial goals.

This book includes simple illustrations and charts to make a tough subject easier to understand. Using language that is clear and concise, Dawn walks you through many different financial topics, including how to properly invest your money, how to pay for college and the ins and outs of having a mortgage.

With her belief that positive thoughts create positive circumstances, Dawn brings a spiritual element to her financial strategies. She gives you a step-by-step guide to creating the life you want by releasing any blocks you have regarding money and asking your Higher Power for assistance. In this book, she includes the prayer that dramatically changed her life and her finances!

Once you say this prayer and take these steps toward your financial goals, you can have the life you want…or even something better!

Questions:

1)      What is the difference between you and a Robo-advisor I can find online?

I look to build relationships with my clients and get to know them.  Also, I want to know what your goals and dreams are, and I help you find the best way to reach those goals.  A Robo-advisor is going to doing a risk assessment and put you in a cookie-cutter portfolio.  You can’t call them up with questions and they won’t be there to ease your fears when the market gets volatile.  I will.  With me, you get personalized service and all my expertise.

2)      Are you a fiduciary? What is a fiduciary?

Yes, I am.  A fiduciary has a legal obligation to put your needs ahead of their own.

3)      What are your qualifications?

I am a Certified Financial Planner™.  To become certified I went through several years of training, passed a series of exams including the final test to become a Certified Financial Planner™.  I consider myself a geek lol, and it was the hardest test I have ever taken.  Typically, there is only a 62% pass rate, I passed my first time.

4)      What services do you offer?

Holistic financial planning, investment advice and management, and insurance planning.  I offer a flat rate, hourly advice, and paid for managing assets.

5)      How will our relationship work?

I will begin by getting to know you and find out what you want your money to do for you and show you the best way to reach those goals.  Communication is important, I will be in touch with you throughout the year via email, virtual meetings, phone calls, in-person meetings if local. You will also be kept up to date on the markets and anything else financially that you need to know about.  I am accessible to you.  I also have many virtual educational workshops throughout the year.

6)      Do you have a custodian? What is a custodian?

Yes, I do have a custodian.  I do not hold my client’s money. A custodian is a regulated institution that is responsible for the safekeeping of clients’ money and it is held at that institution to minimize theft or misuse of the client’s funds. For example, TD Ameritrade is a custodian.

7)      Who are your typical clients?

My typical clients are women, entrepreneurs, and couples.  They are also into the Law of Attraction.

9)      What is your favorite non-work activity?

Mountain Biking and doing Peloton Workouts.

10)  What is your favorite local restaurant and what are you ordering?

I love Vecchia Pizza in Phoenixville.  I’m ordering the Regena Margherita pizza.

11)  What is your favorite TV guilty pleasure?

I recently binged lost and loved it. It came out like ten years ago so I’m a bit behind.

12) What sets you apart from other advisors?

If you are interested in working with me our first meeting is to learn more about your goals and dreams.  We will incorporate the manifestation prayer/affirmation into the meeting and at the next meeting we will clear the money blocks and we’ll review your workbook.  In the following meeting, we will talk about your finances. At the next meeting, we will talk about how to put your plan into action.

  • I also offer just the manifestation prayer and clearing money blocks as a standalone package
  • If clients only want me to manage their money I can do that.
  • I also work by the hour.

*Investment Advisory Services Offered by Sowell Management

 Here is the book link:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1647196671/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=dawn+santoriello&qid=1626975047&sr=8-1

 Social media and website links:

Dawn Santoriello, CFP® 

Dawn@dsfinancialstrategies.com

www.dsfinancialstrategies.com

215-660-0288 office

Financial Fridays with Dawn!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnN1ouX_Ew_hfqEfXlAGGkQ?view_as=subscriber

 https://www.facebook.com/DSfinancialstrategies/

https://www.instagram.com/dsfinancialstrategies/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/dawnsantoriello/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s Talk about Daddy Issues..

Let’s Talk Daddy Issues

I love introducing you to new authors. Allan is the nephew of a dear friend and I think you will appreciate his book. After all, who doesn’t have Daddy Issues and who doesn’t need to laugh at provocative, edgy, corny, genius and stupid jokes after the crazy year we’ve all had?

Daddy Issues is an inside look of author Allan Sidley’s best and worst jokes over his comedy career. Poking fun at real subjects like his family, religion, politics, and pokémon, you’ll laugh when you should(n’t), groan often, and see words transform right before your eyes.

For those who are dads, have their own daddy issues, or are simply human, this book reminds us humor is in EVERYTHING. A therapy session cheaper than your co-pay, Daddy Issues celebrates life’s highs, mediums, and loathes.

The Book

Read the rest of this entry »

20 Things Not to Say to Someone With PTSD

As someone that lives with PTSD, and after reading this article I knew I had to share it. I hope you will do the same. 20 Things Not to Say to Someone With PTSD Alexander Draghici, MS, LCPC By  February 2, 2021

Imagine you are the survivor of a horrible car crash. One day, while you’re walking down the street, you hear a car horn followed by a screeching noise. Before you get a chance to look around and figure out what happened, you feel a sudden rush of adrenaline. Fear paralyzes you from head to toe, and your mind fills up with images of the accident in which you were involved not long ago. It may look like you’re overreacting from the outside, but from the inside, everything feels so ‘real’ and overwhelming. And so, you sit there shaking and waiting for something horrible to happen.

speaking to someone with PTSD

For someone with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the world no longer looks like a place worth exploring but rather a minefield where every step presents a risk.

As you can probably imagine, being hypervigilant and ‘on edge’ most of the day is exhausting. In time, and without proper help, you will eventually shut down because you don’t feel like there’s someone who can truly understand what you’re going through.

 

But part of the reason people who’ve been through traumatic events resort to social isolation is that society often fails to provide what people living with PTSD genuinely need.

And it’s not out of ignorance or ill-intention, not always, but merely a lack of understanding of the difficulties associated with this condition. This manifests in the public services offered to them, the reactions of their loves to their condition, and even in the way those around them communicate with them.

So, here is a list of things you SHOULDN’T say to someone with PTSD:

1. “You’ll get over it”

Whether someone is dealing with depression, burnout, or PTSD, telling them to simply “Get over it” will trivialize the severity of their condition and make them feel like they’re not strong enough.

Imagine you are dealing with something so painful that it almost seems unsolvable. At the same time, you keep hearing that it’s nothing and you should get over it. At some point, you begin to feel like you are the problem; you are the one who doesn’t have what it takes to overcome your condition.

 

2. “You’re just a bit shocked; that’s all”

A traumatic event can send shockwaves for months (even years) after the initial impact.

It’s like throwing a rock into a pond. Even though the waves are not as ‘loud’ as the initial splash, they’re still strong enough to disturb the surface of the water.

But the worst part is that if you find yourself in a triggering situation, your mind will (emotionally) reenact the trauma, which can be shocking enough to make you avoid specific contexts or experience intense anxiety if you have nowhere to run.

Long story short, people with PTSD are not “just a bit shocked.”

3. “I’m no expert, but I think you should…”

Stop!

Nobody, regardless of the problems they are dealing with, wants to hear unsolicited advice.

In fact, there’s a good chance that someone who’s going through a rough patch might have already tried what you’re about to suggest.

For people with PTSD, an empathetic ear or a shoulder to cry on is significantly more valuable than any piece of ‘expert’ advice you might have picked off the Internet.

Just stop at “I’m no expert” because you’re definitely not. All you need to be is the person who can listen and understand.

4. “Maybe you need to do more and complain less”

Once again, we have a perfect example of an invalidating response resulting from a lack of empathy and understanding.

When you’re dealing with something as emotionally draining as PTSD, there’s little energy left for anything else. It’s not that you don’t want to do more; it’s just that every attempt to get past your traumatic experience feels like a herculean task.

Patience is a crucial factor during the recovery process, and just because someone is complaining doesn’t mean they don’t actively work on their problem.

5. “It’s not that bad”

Sometimes, people think that making a problem seem less severe will somehow take the burden off the sufferer’s shoulders, thus speeding recovery.

Although the intention is good, playing down the severity of the problem can backfire horribly. More specifically, you risk becoming yet another person who doesn’t understand the pain and difficulties associated with PTSD.

If you want to provide support to someone who’s been through a traumatic event, don’t evaluate the situation based on your criteria.

Listen, understand, and try to see the pain through his/her eyes.

6. “Others have it worse”

Comparing one sufferer to another can sometimes be useful as it sheds new light on the situation. The fact that life could have been far worse represents a glimmer of hope that paves the way for a better future.

But this perspective only works when the sufferer has already overcome helplessness and is making real steps towards recovery.

Otherwise, it’s just another trigger for shame and guilt.

7. “Stop making a big fuss about it”

This reply screams frustration right off the bat.

It’s the kind of thing that tends to slip out of your mouth when, for some reason, you’re feeling emotionally unavailable, or perhaps you’ve grown tired of hearing the same complaints over and over again.

If you don’t feel emotionally available, perhaps it would be wiser to take a step back for a moment instead of venting your frustration to someone who’s already in a dark place.

People with PTSD make a big fuss about it because the pain and anxiety can be truly unbearable at times.

8. “I have a friend who’s been through a similar situation, and he got over it”

Just like “Others have it worse,” telling someone with PTSD that they’ll get over it simply because you’ve seen others recovering from the same condition is a faulty comparison.

For starters, one person’s trauma is hardly comparable to another’s. People’s reaction to traumatic events varies depending on their personality, emotional resilience, coping mechanisms, and social support system.

9. “You’re completely irrational”

Given that the underlying emotions people with PTSD experience most of the time are fear and anticipatory anxiety, it’s no surprise that rational arguments prove entirely ineffective.

Additionally, telling people that they’re irrational will definitely not make them adopt a rational perspective. It will only deepen their sense of worthlessness and helplessness.

Often, a simple gesture of, “Help me understand why this situation is difficult for you” is far more helpful than saying, “Let’s look at your problem from a rational standpoint.”

10. “You have to face your fears”

Facing your fears or, as experts call it, exposure therapy is one of the most effective strategies in dealing with PTSD and other anxiety disorders.

Current evidence suggests that both intensive prolonged exposure and virtual-reality augmented exposure can help individuals overcome traumatic experiences.

But this process should only take place under the guidance and supervision of a licensed counselor or therapist.

For people with PTSD, facing their fears can be a huge endeavor requiring patience and careful planning.

11. “You must be really sensitive”

Given that people living with PTSD avoid contexts that could trigger them or behave ‘strangely’ when confronted with a situation that reminds them of their traumatic experience, it’s easy to label them as sensitive.

But this sensitivity isn’t a feature of their identity but a coping mechanism that shields them from further pain and suffering.

Remember that some of them are battle-hardened veterans who could do things that most of us wouldn’t even have the courage to try.

12. “Loosen up a bit; you’re too uptight”

Telling someone with PTSD to loosen up is like telling someone with depression to smile more often.

The reason why people who’ve been through traumatic events seem uptight is that they shield themselves from anything that might trigger that painful memory.

For them, loosening up means letting their guard down, something for which they might not feel ready yet.

13. “Are you a war veteran?”

Given that a significant proportion of people who struggle with PTSD are soldiers and war veterans, we can understand why this stereotype has taken root.

But PTSD can result from a wide range of traumatic events. From emotional and sexual abuse, domestic violence, and severe illness to car accidents, the death of a loved one, and natural disasters, any event that shakes you to the core can trigger the onset of PTSD.

The best thing you can do is ask before making any assumptions that could put the other person in an awkward position.

14. “Leave the past behind”

Unfortunately, it’s not that easy for the human mind to leave the past behind, especially when the past holds something that has shaken the very core of your personality.

When something traumatic happens, the brain registers the event to prevent it from happening again. That’s why some memories will stick and remain with us forever.

In short, the past isn’t something that we should forget or put behind, but understand, accept and integrate into our experience.

15. “Focus on the Positive”

We know that humans possess a diverse spectrum of emotions, some being pleasant, others less so. But each emotional experience has a purpose and a valuable message that we need to hear.

If we choose to focus on “positive vibes only” (and encourage others to do the same), all we are doing is running away from ourselves.

Unpleasant emotions are part of who we are just as much as pleasant ones are.

16. “Let’s talk about something else”

Although being close to people who’ve experienced a tragedy may feel ‘heavy’ at times, it’s vital to create a space where they can unburden their soul.

As long as ‘the wound is still fresh,’ trying to change the subject to something less tragic in hopes of lifting their mood will only result in disappointment.

There’s a good chance you’ll make them feel like a burden.

17. “Why didn’t you say anything at that time?”

Trauma survivors rarely talk about what they’ve been through, especially immediately after the event. It is usually when people notice changes in their behavior that they begin to share their struggles.

On top of that, it’s challenging to be open about something as painful as sexual abuse or domestic violence. Especially when you know that people might not understand what you’re going through, and the authorities might not always have the power to provide proper assistance.

18. “Let’s do something fun”

When you’re having a hard time adjusting to everyday life, fun is the last thing on your mind.

Even if you try to do something to take your mind off the problems you face, there’s always that profound sense of imminent threat that’s keeping you from enjoying a fun activity.

Instead of suggesting something fun, try to create a safe space where they can experience a sense of comfort and calm.

19. “Didn’t this happen a long time ago?”

Asking this question is like saying, “You should have been over it by now.”

It’s definitely something you don’t want to say to someone who’s already having a hard time going about his/her daily life.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, it takes 6 to 12 weeks of psychotherapy for someone with PTSD to achieve recovery. But keep in mind this is just a rough estimate.

20. “It will only get better and better from now on”

As an outside observer, it’s easy to see the light at the end of the tunnel. But when you’re dealing with something as debilitating as PTSD, all you can see are miles and miles of tunnel.

Being Helpful

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a complicated condition with numerous emotional, psychological, and behavioral factors that affect one’s ability to perceive a better future.

So instead of desperately pointing towards the light, try helping those suffering from PTSD navigate through the tunnel until they find their own way out.

Alexander Draghici, MS, LCPC

Alexander Draghici is a licensed Clinical Psychologist and CBT practitioner. His work focuses mainly on strategies designed to help people manage and prevent two of the most common emotional problems – anxiety and de

SOURCE: https://www.e-counseling.com/ptsd/things-not-to-say-to-someone-with-ptsd/

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Melody’s Magical Flying Machine

WRITING WEDNESDAY 

I LOVE introducing you to fabulous authors and great books. Elaine and I met in Nashville and again in Las Vegas where we were both presenters at the BAM Conference.

She is so talented, lovely and hysterically funny! 

About the book: An image posted by the author.

Melody is an amusing ten-year-old girl with Down syndrome who loves to daydream beneath a catalpa tree in the backyard. She narrates her story and explains, “I can do almost everything other children can do, and I’m happy.”

She loves her teacher, going to the library, and playing with her little brother as he tells knock-knock jokes. After a sad day, she meets an enchanted talking bird, and they use a 3-D printer to create a flying machine pulled by two dragons.

Melody soars over the playground to amaze her friends and confront a group of bullies. Melody’s energetic talent in storytelling empowers her to educate others about Down syndrome while sharing her tall tales and strong hugs. Caroline Zina’s pencil illustrations are beautifully textured and shaded, with a magical quality that deftly matches the text.

Read the rest of this entry »

Blessing or a Curse..#IWSG

Insecure Writers Support Group Purpose:

To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

Posting:  The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer – aim for a dozen new people each time – and return comments. This group is all about connecting! Be sure to link to this page and display the badge in your post. And please be sure your avatar links back to your blog! Otherwise, when you leave a comment, people can’t find you to comment back. Let’s rock the neurotic writing world! Our Twitter handle is @TheIWSG and hashtag is #IWSG.

Every month, we announce a question that members can answer in their IWSG post. These questions may prompt you to share advice, insight, a personal experience or story. Include your answer to the question in your IWSG post or let it inspire your post if you are struggling with something to say.

 

Remember, the question is optional!

December 2 question – Are there months or times of the year that you are more productive with your writing than other months, and why?

Most definitely! I’ve always been a procrastinator but I also work well with deadlines. For those reasons, I think during the month of November, I always start to feel twinges of anxiety and regret that I haven’t accomplished the goals I wanted to that year. January 1st is looming and I need to come up with NEW goals! My choices are to kick it into high gear and finish, or roll a few goals into the new year. Let’s face it, this year sucked on SO many different levels. I’ve faired well, I don’t have much to complain about and so much to be grateful for. I wish it was the same for everyone but it hasn’t been:(

My 3rd book was released on March 17th. Two days into the Pennsylvania and pretty much the entire worlds shut down. Was I devastated? Yes, of course. But the book Realize your Writing Dreams is a book on writing, publishing and marketing. So many people that were laid off from their jobs decided it would be a great time to write that book they always wanted to write! It turned out to be the perfect time for that books release.

The New Year, January is always a productive writing month for me. I always want to have a better year than the last, and am motivated to get off to a good start. That usually last a month.

For as long as I can remember late Spring, Summer and early Fall have always been my most creative and most productive writing seasons. I’m a Pisces, so during those seasons I spend a lot of time at the beach, it’s my favorite writing space.

One of my 2020 goals was to host a writing retreat at the beach. I planned it and was so excited. Sadly, I had to scale it way back but it still happened and it was amazing. Another reason to be so grateful. I’ll be writing about the retreat next week!

How about you? Are you cramming in writing time to complete your 2020 goals? Has this year been a curse or a blessing in disguise? Have you chosen 2021 writing goals or at this point are we going to be happy to arrive in 2021 in one piece?

Have a Blessed Holiday Season Everyone!,

Doreen

The awesome co-hosts for the December 2 posting of the IWSG are Pat Garcia, Sylvia Ney, Liesbet @ Roaming About Cathrina Constantine, and Natalie Aguirre! Please stop by and thank them.

Read the rest of this entry »

It’s Another Meeting for the Insecure Writers..

Insecure Writer’s Support Group

It’s time for another group posting of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Time to release our fears to the world – or offer encouragement to those who are feeling neurotic. If you’d like to join us, click on the tab above and sign up. We post the first Wednesday of every month. I encourage everyone to visit at least a dozen new blogs and leave a comment. Your words might be the encouragement someone needs.

September Question If you could choose one author, living or dead, to be your beta partner, who would it be and why?

What a tough question! After giving it some thought, I would love to meet and have a conversation with Nora Roberts. Having her beta read for me would have me so nervous, but what an honor it would be.

Nora has written more than 200 romance novels! She also writes under the pen names, J.D. Robb, Jill March, and Sarah Hardesty. Can you imagine having your novels on the NYT Best seller list for 861 weeks, 176 weeks in the #1 spot.

She write’s eight-hours a day, even when she’s on vacation. That’s impressive! Writing mostly trilogies, Nora doesn’t write from an outline but creates a short first draft with all the elements of the story and then adds texture and color in her second draft, something I’d love to learn more about from her.

Read the rest of this entry »

Never Give Up #IWSG

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

“Behind every good writer is another good writer that has their back.”

Read the rest of this entry »

An Ebook Sale..

WRITING WEDNESDAY

For the next 30 days Realize Your Writing Dreams is ONLY 99 cents!!

Thank you SO much for reading, reviewing, sharing and calling your library and asking the to order the book. I LOVE you for that xxxooo!

Read the rest of this entry »

Stranger In My Recliner book cover
Realize Your Writing Dreams by Doreen McGettigan
Book - Bristol Boyz Stomp by Doreen McGettigan
Subscribe/Follow
Enter your Email:
Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz